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    Runaway Slaves in Britain--New Digital Resource!

    Hello Everyone! I know it's been a while since I've posted a blog entry. Teaching five classes last semester did not leave me with much time to explore new resources. I just learned about a new resource today that I think will be useful to a wide variety of historians. British universities have been working very hard to tell the story of race and slavery in the UK, and we have a new resource to go along with some of those already featured on this site such as the Legacies of British Slave Ownership Database. 

    This latest resource is the Runaway Slaves in Britain database. This project explores a variety of English and Scottish newspapers and then cataloged and digitized escaped slave advertisements. Runaway Slaves goes a long way towards telling the story of slavery in Britain from 1700-1780 (before the major era of abolition). This will be a very important resource for all those interested in slavery and the British Atlantic World in the 18th century. 

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    Jonathan

    About Jonathan

    I am currently an Adjunct Professor of History at Lynchburg College in Virginia. I received my PhD in Modern British History from Florida State University in 2016. My research explores the way in which competing definitions of masculinity influenced army reform in the mid-nineteenth century. Civilians called for moral reforms; however, they were constantly hampered by politician and military officials' financial concerns. This work offers a number of interventions in the current historiography by exploring issues of corporal punishment, soldiers' sexuality, military suicide, and soldiers' families. 




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