Making Research Accessible

Research Freedom is an open project dedicated to making research more accessible to everyone. Our site contains reviews of digital and physical archives to make your research time more efficient.

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  1. Jonathan

    Summer Research Trips

    By Jonathan ·
    It has been a while since I have blogged for this site. The spring semester got crazy, and then I spent quite a bit of my summer visiting archives and working on research projects. I spent two weeks at the end of May working in the National Army Museum archive in London and back at the British Library. I wanted to take a quick moment to encourage you all to provide a review for any archives you may have visited recently.  In other news, I am preparing two new classes for the Fall semester, so I will be adding more US focused digital archives over the next couple of months. I hope you have had a productive summer filled with research and writing, or just relaxation. Please contact us for information about contributing to the site! 

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  2. Jonathan

    Mapping Racial Violence

    By Jonathan ·
    It's been a while since I have uploaded a new blog entry. To be honest, I got totally swamped by the semester. I had the opportunity to teach a U.S. History survey class this semester that focused on the end of Reconstruction to the present. One of the unifying themes that my students and I have discussed is the use of racial violence to support white supremacy in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. At times, this has been an emotional and fraught experience. I recently came across an article in the Smithsonian Magazine that talked about a new digital history project that maps every incident of racial violence or lynchings from 1877 to the present nationwide. It provides details about every lynching recorded. This is an amazing resource, and I cannot wait to share it with my students soon.  I'm looking forward to hearing your thoughts in the comment below. Please feel free to contribute your own tips, hints, or resources in a blog entry on this site!     

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  3. Jonathan

    Histography

    By Jonathan ·
    I hope everyone has had a great holiday season! I've spent a significant part of the break continuing to look for new digital history projects that we can discuss here at Research Freedom. I am also preparing to teach two new classes this spring, so I have been really interested in new potential teaching tools. This is where Histography comes in. It's a new interactive historical timeline, where every dot represents a significant moment in world history. The great thing about this is that it allows you to access the Wikipedia page for additional information.  I also really like the "Editorial Stories" part of the site. This provides access to videos, the Wikipedia page, and related resources. This is a more in-depth discussion of the topics. I think that this will be a great way for students to visualize history, and I am looking forward to showing my classes this Spring.  Check out Histography for yourself. Let me know what you think below. 

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  4. Jonathan

    The Liberated Africans Project

    By Jonathan ·
    The Liberated Africans Project explores what happened to 200,000 emancipated Africans as a part of the international movement to abolish the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The really interesting thing about this project is that it is extremely collaborative. One of the major issues with researching this topic has been that the information is spread in archives across the world and in multiple languages. The key source material for this project are the Vice Admiralty Courts. These courts handled all of the cases where the British Navy seized slave ships off the coast of Africa. This site is currently under development, but it will eventually have thousands of records from Cuba, Brazil, and Sierra Leone. Aside from the Vice Admiralty Courts, the site also contains an image library that is really useful. This is a great teaching resource. 
    Image Credit: The Liberated Africans Project See our resource review here.

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  • This is a recently reopened museum that traces the history of the British Army. The archive has a wealth of source material drawn from regimental museums and family donations of material.

    Fields Empire and Imperialism, Military
    Geographic Focus Canada, Caribbean, Latin America, Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, Asia, China, India, Japan, Africa, East Africa, Egypt, South Africa, West Africa, Australia and New Zealand
    Chronology 1700s, 1800s, 1900s
    • Price

      Free
    • Access

      Physical Only
    • Jonathan

      Contributed By

      Jonathan
  • Reno, Nevada was the world's divorce capital for nearly six decades. This project contains hundreds of digitized images, publications, documents, and media.

    Fields Class, Crime and Punishment, Economics, Gender and Sexuality, Legal, Political
    Geographic Focus United States
    Chronology 1900s
    • Price

      Free
    • Access

      Online Only
    • Jonathan

      Contributed By

      Jonathan
  • The Spectator first emerged in 1828 promising to "convey intelligence." This archive contains digitized copies of every edition of the newspaper from 1828 to 2008. This is an extremely important source for political and cultural information regarding Britain and its colonies.

    Fields Class, Crime and Punishment, Economics, Empire and Imperialism, Environmental, Gender and Sexuality, Legal, Medicine, Military, Political, Race, Religion, Science, Slavery
    Geographic Focus United States, Canada, Caribbean, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and New Zealand
    Chronology 1800s, 1900s, 2000s
    • Price

      Free
    • Access

      Online Only
    • Jonathan

      Contributed By

      Jonathan
  • From 1830 until well after the American Civil War, Free Blacks and Fugitive slaves met in state and national "conventions" to discuss important issues. This new Digital Humanities project seeks to understand the social worlds and collective organizing potential of these conventions.

    Fields Class, Economics, Gender and Sexuality, Legal, Political, Race, Religion
    Geographic Focus United States
    Chronology 1800s
    • Price

      Free
    • Access

      Online Only
    • Jonathan

      Contributed By

      Jonathan

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