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Five Best Free Legal Dictionaries

There is no reason to buy a copy of Black’s Law Dictionary before your first day of law school when there are plenty of comprehensive, free glossaries on the web. Below is a short list of some of the best free online dictionaries.

1. Google – Yet again, Google ranks as the most useful free resource. To automatically search the dictionary directories, enter the tag “definition: [word]” (e.g., “definition: gag order”). This resource also allows the user to listen to the word, which could be useful for certain latin terminology. Also provides links to various other references.

Gag order: Noun: A judge’s order that a case may not be discussed in public.

2.  FindLaw Dictionary – Owned by West, this free dictionary provides simple definitions and limited examples for a wide-array of legal terms. The dictionary is difficult to locate from FindLaw’s main site, so use the provided link above. Designed for legal professionals and law students.

Gag Order: an order barring public disclosure or discussion (as by the involved parties or the press) of information relating to a case.

3. Law.com Dictionary – More extensive than FindLaw’s dictionary with the added ability to search through definitions for specific words or phrases. Albeit the site is targeted at non-lawyers, the definitions are must more robust than those on FindLaw and include useful examples and explanations.

Gag Order: n. a judge’s order prohibiting the attorneys and the parties to a pending lawsuit or criminal prosecution from talking to the media or the public about the case. The supposed intent is to prevent prejudice due to pre-trial publicity which would influence potential jurors. A gag order has the secondary purpose of preventing the lawyers from trying the case in the press and on television, and thus creating a public mood (which could get ugly) in favor of one party or the other. Based on the “freedom of the press” provision of the First Amendment, the court cannot constitutionally restrict the media from printing or broadcasting information about the case, so the only way is to put a gag on the participants under the court’s control. In Canada, however, the media can be restricted, as in a famous case in which American newspapers were smuggled across the border to report on a particularly lurid sex-murder case in which a second accused person was yet to be tried. A gag order can also be made by an executive agency such as when President George Bush issued a gag order which forbade federally funded health clinics from giving out information about abortions, a gag order which President Bill Clinton rescinded on his first day in office, January 22, 1993.

4. Wex Legal Dictionary – This is a free, “community-built” legal dictionary and encyclopedia hosted by Cornell’s Legal Information Institute. This site pulls definitions from various other dictionaries, including Nolo’s Plain English Law Dictionary, another free, browsable dictionary. One of the benefits of this resource is that the site also provides search results to documents containing that particular search term.

Gag Order: A judge’s order prohibiting the attorneys and parties in a pending lawsuit or criminal prosecution from talking about the case to the media or the public.

5. The Free Dictionary – Sourcing words and definitions from West’s Encyclopedia of American Law, Edition 2, containing “more than 4,000 entries detailing terms, concepts, events, movements, cases, and individuals significant to United States law.” The dictionary also includes words and definitions from The People’s Law Dictionary and the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. Definitions pages include definitions from multiple sources, usage sentences, and a thesaurus.

Gag Order: n. a court order restricting information or comment by the participants involved in a lawsuit; “imposing a gag order on members of the press violates the First Amendment.”

 

Runners-Up:

Legal Explanations – A surprisingly comprehensive directory of legal terms and plain-English definitions (over 2,500 legal definitions, to be specific). This dictionary is not searchable; browse words to locate definitions.

The Law Dictionary – Very select words/ definitions from Black’s Law Dictionary. Provides a word of the day and a variety of obscure legal terms. Primary a marketing site.

Duhaime’s Legal Dictionary – Provides a browsable glossary of legal terms and plain-English definitions.


Unlimited Free Lexis Searches of California Cases and Statutes

If you’re a California attorney or you’re researching California caselaw, this post is for you. Through the California Courts website, you can access the Lexis California database (cases from 1850 to present) … for free!

This means unlimited searches, retrieval, and saving (for personal use only). The free service also includes Deering’s Annotated Code and the Unannotated California Code. However, be aware that, from the portal, you are unable to access the Shepard’s feature.

To access the portal, click here. Select “Official Reports Opinions” and accept the Terms and Conditions.


Google Scholar Bootcamp for Attorneys

The newest trend in legal research is the integration of free legal research tools into tried-and-true paid platforms such as Lexis and Westlaw. The most popular of these free tools is Google Scholar, which provides an excellent caselaw search mechanism.

The use of Google Scholar for legal research is exploding in law practice. In a 2010 survey, nearly half of responding attorneys indicated that they used free services such as Google Scholar rather than paying for commercial sources. The increased attention to this free resource is also reflected in the research curricula of legal writing departments nationwide. In a recent survey by the Legal Writing Institute, 59 out of 188 law schools surveyed are now incorporating Google Scholar into their legal research lessons. Besides Westlaw and Lexis, it was the second most popular research source taught behind WestlawNext.

What can I do with Google Scholar?

Currently, the best uses of Google Scholar are: (1) case retrieval (which is faster than Lexis and Westlaw); (2) finding related cases (similar to, but more limited than, Keycite and Shepard’s); (3) testing out keywords and terms/connectors for planning fee-based searches; and (4) locating a wide-array of secondary sources, including topics not traditionally reached by fee-based services (e.g., social science journals).

What can’t I do in Google Scholar?

Before exploring some of these capabilities, it’s important to mention some of Google Scholar’s limitations:

  • Citators. While searching for related cases is relatively easy, Scholar has yet to integrate a true citator function similar to KeyCite or Shepard’s. As of this writing, the only way to truly be sure a case is still good law is to either hit the citator books or log onto a fee-based service. Thus, combining Google Scholar research with fee-based research is essential at this point.
  • Search Results. Google’s algorithm (the formula Google uses to rank search results) remains somewhat of a mystery. Whereas fee-based services allow the user to manipulate the algorithm and rank results in a customized manner, Google’s process is opaque.
  • Content Limitations. Users of Google Scholar must be aware of some significant content limitations. According to the Google Scholar FAQ, Google’s state directories are limited to U.S. state appellate and supreme court cases beginning in 1950. State materials before 1950 are patchy. On the federal level, Google only searches U.S. federal district, appellate, tax, and bankruptcy cases from 1923. Notably, U.S. Supreme Court decisions prior to 1791 are also absent (which is probably fine unless you need to reach farther back than Marbury v. Madison (1803)).
  • Mysterious updating. According to Google’s FAQ, the search engine “normally add[s] new papers several times a week.” Updating existing cases can take several months, depending on the speed of Google’s crawling bots.
  • Retrieval limitations. Once you’ve found materials you’d like to retrieve, the printing, downloading, and emailing options are quite limited.

Notwithstanding the foregoing limitations of Scholar, this engine, when combined with fee-based resources, is a cost-effective way of conducting legal research. Below is a list of tips for optimizing your search experience.

1. Setting Your Homepage to Automatically Search a Specific Jurisdiction.

To set your browser’s homepage to automatically search a specific directory, go to http://scholar.google.com and click “Advanced Scholar Search” next to the search box. Under “Collections,” click “Select specific courts to search.” This maximizes a comprehensive list of state and federal courts, including specialized federal courts such as the Court of Claims, Court of Customs and Patent Appeals, Court of International Trade, Customs Court, and the tax courts. Select the directory or directories you’d like to automatically search upon opening your browser. No need to enter additional information, unless you’d like to add keywords or date restrictions to the automatic search. Then, at the bottom of the page, click “Search Scholar.” This leads to a Google Scholar search page. Either bookmark the link or add the link to your browser’s home page preferences. From this page, your search will be automatically limited to the directory of your choice.

2. Finding a known case and creating an alert.

If you know a case by party name or citation in either the official or the unofficial reporter, retrieving the case using Google Scholar is far more cost-effective than retrieving and/or printing it using Lexis, Westlaw, or some other fee-based service. It’s also much faster– try .19 seconds. Once you search for a case name or citation, you can follow the case by creating an email alert for the case– the same function as Westlaw’s KeyCite Alerts. From the results page, click “Create Email Alert” on the upper menu bar and enter your email address. Every time a new case mentions the case you’re following, you will receive an email alert.

3. Searching for a case.

You will have the most control over your search if you limit your search to specific jurisdictions before entering any keywords into the search box. As mentioned above, to choose a specific directory to search, click “Advanced Scholar Search” next to the initial search box. Scroll down to “Legal opinions and journals.” Here, there are options to search all opinions or limit your search to specific jurisdictions. For even more options, click “Select specific courts to search,” which provides an extensive checklist of options. Once you have made your choice, this takes you back to the original search screen. Now you’re ready to compose your search string.

In Google-speak, search connectors are called “operators.” Below is a list of common Google operators from Google’s Advanced Scholar Search Tips:

  • the “author:” operator returns results from a specific author; there should be no spaces between the operator and the author’s name, as in [author:flowers];
  • the “+” operator makes sure your results include common words, letters or numbers that Google’s search technology generally ignores, as in [+de knuth];
  • the “-” operator excludes all results that include this search term, as in [flowers -author:flowers];
  • phrase search only returns results that include this exact phrase, as in ["as you like it"];
  • the “OR” operator returns results that include either of your search terms, as in [stock call OR put];
  • the “intitle:” operator as in [intitle:mars] only returns results that include your search term in the document’s title.

Note that the operator only affects the search term directly following it, so if you want the operator to apply to a phrase, put the phrase in quotations.

If you’re trying to search for an opinion written by a particular judge or justice, you can try the “author:[judge]” operator. Note, however, that this isn’t always accurate. For example, the first search result of “author:Scalia” was United States v. Booker, which was actually authored by Justice Stevens. For more accurate results, try searching using the phrase: “Scalia delivered”. Using the foregoing operators, you can construct a more intelligent search.

4. Viewing a case

One of the most notable features of the case view in Google Scholar is the formatting of footnotes — as endnotes. If you’re married to in-text footnotes, Google Scholar isn’t for you.

Also be aware that Scholar provides less internal citations than Lexis or Westlaw, particularly with respect to authority published before 1950. Another important omission in Google Scholar’s case-view are links to statutes, regulations, etc. So if you’re primarily searching for codified law, Google Scholar probably isn’t the place to find it. However, simply cutting and pasting a statutory citation into a Google search should link you to the text.

5. Using the “How Cited” Function

One of Scholar’s most useful features is the “How Cited” tab at the top of a case. Once you’ve located a relevant case, clicking “How Cited” can lead you to a wealth of related authority, in very much the same way as a KeyCite or Shepard’s check would. The only notable difference is that Google doesn’t provide treatment symbols/categories next to related cases. For an example of a How Cited page, click here. How Cited provides three (3) distinct features.

The first aspect of the How Cited tab is the “How this document has been cited” function. Essentially, this provides a list of cases that actually discuss the main case in some way. Clicking on the case links will take you directly to the passage relating to the main case. This allows the user to actually read the case and decide on the treatment.

The second aspect of the How Cited tab is the “Cited by” function. This provides complete search results within the Google directories for citations to the main case. This is the closest Google Scholar gets to KeyCiting/Shepardizing. Simply peruse decisions rendered after the date of decision in the main case to learn subsequent treatment. Be aware, however, of Scholar’s limitations; it’s unclear how quickly new cases are posted.

The final aspect of the How Cited tab is the “Related documents” feature. These search results provide an expanded listing of journal articles, books, and other secondary authority, as well as related cases. This is yet another way to find related authority and helpful background on the law.

UPDATE: Google has announced that it is now listing cases based upon the extent to which the cited case is discussed, which– as the Law Librarian Blog points out– brings Scholar even closer to KeyCite/Shepard’s functionality. Here’s the text explaining Google’s change, courtesy of the Law Librarian Blog:

Today [March 8], we are changing how we present citations to legal opinions. Now, instead of sorting the citing documents by their prominence, we sort them by the extent of discussion of the cited case. Opinions that discuss the cited case in detail are presented before ones that mention the case briefly. We indicate the extent of discussion visually and indicate opinions that discuss the cited case at length, that discuss it moderately and those that discuss it briefly. Opinions that don’t discuss the cited case are left unmarked.


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